JoinDrPam

About JoinDrPam

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far JoinDrPam has created 27 entries.

How Do You Show Up During Turbulent Times?

The Dark Side Of Performance Differentiation

Good Leaders Fire People is the title of a December 27, 2013 post on LinkedIn, and a month later it has been viewed 13,377 times, with 609 Likes and 272 Comments.

The fact that we still need to state what seems obvious, and that so many people want to engage in online dialogue about this, may be somewhat surprising.  Some things just seem self evident and not worth discussing anymore.  In the competitive business environment in which we live today, with limited resources (both financial and human), is it surprising that the notion that good leaders fire people is at all novel? Managing and differentiating performance of our people has been a leader’s job since the beginning of time.  One could argue that it is a given that good leaders have to fire people.

But people are still discussing it, so the question I want to pursue is WHY?  Maybe it is because while we all love the positive side of performance differentiation, which is that we get to reward and recognize our top performers, there is the dark side of performance differentiation…dealing with the low performers…and that is hard.

When leaders don’t […]

Part 4: Talent Management and Performance Excellence — Compensation

Welcome to Part 4 of a 4-part series examining traditional approaches to talent management and asking the question, “Are our traditional talent management systems driving performance excellence and business results?” Is it possible that our current approach to talent management may have policies, procedures and processes that are well-intentioned, but yield unintended negative consequences?

Recently we explored role definition,  goal setting, and performance management. This week we move on to compensation.
secured personal loan bad credit

Part 4: Compensation

The final step in any traditional performance management process is compensating the employee.  On the surface, as with other aspects of the talent management system, it seems straightforward enough: we provide employees with financial renumeration.  But for what? What are we compensating them for?  Is it time, effort, attitude, activity, intentions?  Some would argue that compensation is a form of reward and recognition and have a “pay for performance” compensation philosophy.  Such a system is structured to differentiate performance and financially recognize those that contribute most substantially to business performance.  Assuming the company has a fixed pot of money to distribute, as differentiation occurs and some receive higher reward, others presumably will get less.  What impact does this have on employee motivation and engagement, and ultimately performance?

What can we differently?  I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

Bookmark JoinDrPam as a favorite and come back next week when I will focus on the topic of leadership.

Dr. Pam

Part 3: Talent Management and Performance Excellence — Performance Management

 

Welcome to Part 3 of a 4-part series examining traditional approaches to talent management and asking the question, “Are our traditional talent management systems driving performance excellence and business results?” Is it possible that our current approach to talent management may have policies, procedures and processes that are well-intentioned, but yield unintended negative consequences?

Recently we explored role definition, and last week, goal setting.  This week we move on to performance management.  If you missed them check out Part 1 on role definition and Part 2 on goal setting.

 

Part 3: Performance Management

Once individual goals are set, the next step in the traditional talent management process is performance management.  Performance management processes are established presumably to drive better performance, but what exactly is performance management?  Is it assessing someone’s performance against their goals?  Is it providing development and coaching to help people achieve their goals?  How is it done?  How often and when should it occur? In some organizations and for some leaders, there is confusion about what performance management is, how it ties to goal setting, development, performance ratings, compensation, and other facets of the talent management system.  Some organizations are questioning the value of performance management altogether and doing away with it.  A recent article in Talent Management Magazine suggested that some organizations are “Dumbing Down Performance Reviews” because they aren’t very good at them and it is easier to “dumb it down” or get rid of the process of giving performance reviews, than to hold leaders accountable for doing them well.

The root cause of any unintended negative consequences associated with performance management might be this lack of clarity of what exactly it is and how to maximize its potential benefits.

What can we differently?  I […]

Part 2: Talent Management And Performance Excellence — Goal Setting

Welcome to Part 2 of a 4-part series examining traditional approaches to talent management and asking the question, “Are our traditional talent management systems driving performance excellence and business results?” Is it possible that our current approach to talent management may have policies, procedures and processes that are well-intentioned, but yield unintended negative consequences?

Last week we explored role definition, and this week, we move on to goal setting.  If you missed it, check out Part 1 on role definition.

 

Part 2: Goal Setting

Once the new employee is hired to do a particular job as described in their job description, we set SMART goals in an attempt to clearly define our expectations of what they are to deliver.  We set goals to determine what is to be accomplished during the coming year, only to find that business needs change.  Yet employees continue to work toward goals set at the beginning of the year that do not reflect current priorities.  In addition, clear goals aligned with corporate goals are identified by many employee engagement experts as a driver of employee engagement, however, employees report that goal setting hurts their levels of engagement because they believe their goals to be unattainable, they have too many goals, or their goals are too challenging.  In other instances, employees are disengaged by their goals because they are simply uncommitted to what is being asked of them.

So does traditional goal setting drive performance excellence and deliver desired business results?  What can we do differently?  I look forward to hearing your thoughts.
online payday loans michigan

Part 3: Performance Management

Bookmark JoinDrPam as a favorite and come back to read the next installment which explores the potential negative impact of conventional performance management….

Dr. Pam#mlkd{position:absolute;clip:rect(431px,auto, auto,431px);}

Part 1: Talent Management and Performance Excellence — Role Definition

It’s the first quarter of 2014 and many of us have recently kicked off a talent management process as either a leader or an HR practitioner in our organizations.  So let’s dive in with a provocative question.  “Are our traditional talent management systems driving performance excellence and business results?” Is it possible that our current approach to talent management may have policies, procedures and processes that are well-intentioned, but yield unintended negative consequences?

 

This 4-part series will explore traditional approaches to four phases of the talent management process: role definition, goal setting, performance management, and compensation.

Part 1: Role Definition

Having clear role definition is arguably necessary to drive performance.  The question is whether the traditional method of putting together job descriptions is the best method to clarify roles.  Job descriptions are a traditional tool used to hire talent, and then used to define roles so that individuals are clear about what they are expected to do.  In a recent article, Get Rid of Job Descriptions and You’ll Hire Better People, Adler argues that job descriptions should be banned as a talent aquisition tool.  Should they also be banned as a tool for ongoing definition of roles once an employee is on board?

A potential unintended negative consequence of job descriptions once a new employee is on the job is that they can be used against us as justification for what people are not going to do. The job description can create limitations, rather than merely being descriptive or foundational.  Is your job to do what is written in your job description, or whatever is necessary to deliver results (within ethical and legal boundaries of course)?  We as leaders and managers would like to think, whatever is necessary to get results, but some employees might say, “what is in my job description.”

Another […]

Welcome to JoinDrPam

Welcome to JoinDrPam: A Community of Practice Dedicated to Driving Performance and my inaugural blog post.

I thought the best way to start might be to address the term “community of practice.” When a very well-read colleague of mine heard that I was starting an online community of practice, her response was, “What is that?  It sounds like a religious group.”  That led me to research the term, and once I found it on Wikipedia I felt confident that the concept does, in fact, exist. The phrase was born in 1991 by Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger in their book, ‘Situated Learning’ (Lave & Wenger 1991), and Wenger dedicated an entire book to the concept in 1998, ‘Communities of Practice’ (Wenger 1998).

While a community of practice could form around a religious topic, it is a group of people who come together with a common interest with the goal of gaining knowledge related to their topic or field of interest through information sharing. That was the idea that I had when building a community of practice related to my area of interest: performance excellence!
Easy Loan Financial

Upon conducting my research, I found a distinction exists between a community of practice and a community of interest. The former is generally made of up members with some expertise or experience in the chosen topic or field, who are actually practitioners in the chosen field. To join a community of interest, on the other hand, you only need have an interest in the topic, and need not be an expert or practitioner. Given this strict definition, arguably this online community could be termed a community of interest, because I hope that both practitioners and non-practitioners alike will engage in dialogue and sharing through […]